Senket — Scoring

Basic Scoring Examples

Areas of various basic shapes.

Areas of various basic shapes.

Scoring territory is based purely on the square of the area surrounded (plus any prisoners).

As the blue territories to the right show, the thin diamond occupies 3 units of territory, worth 3^= 9 points. The long diamond occupies 4 units of territory worth 4^= 16 points. The square diamond occupies a total of 5 units of territory, worth 5^= 25 points.

As the red territories to the right show, a simple triangle in the corner occupies 1 square of territory (1 point). A narrow 2-fence triangle on the side and a wide 2-fence triangle on the side each occupy 2 units of territory (4 points each).

In general, any territory can be divided into four separate shapes:

 — Full squares. The square diamond and the thin diamond each contains a single full square. Each full square obviously counts for 1 unit of territory.

 — Triangles. The triangle in the corner shows this shape; it is exactly one triangle. Each triangle is worth 1 unit of territory. The long diamond consists of four triangles. The square diamond is a full square surrounded by four triangles. 

 — Darts. The thin diamond contains a full square with two darts attached. The dart is also worth 1 unit of territory.

This shape contains a dart at each end, a triangle next to each dart, and two corridors at its center, between the two triangles.

This shape contains a dart at each end, a triangle next to each dart, and two corridors at its center, between the two triangles.

 — Corridors. When two fences run parallel and one is just a square above the other (or to the side of the other) the narrow space between them contains one unit. The blue shape to the right has two corridors at its center, in the narrow section.

So the area of any territory can be found by:

  1. counting the full squares it occupies;
  2. counting the additional triangles it occupies;
  3. counting the additional darts it occupies;
  4. counting the additional corridors it occupies.

To score any territory take the units of area, add any prisoners, and square the result.

A Note on Scoring Example Problems

When calculating the score results from examples and problems, any territory that is not completely cut off is impossible to score without knowing what it might connect to in the future. The larger the territory it attaches to, the more it is worth. Since it is impossible to know, for the purposes of comparison territories will generally be scored based only on the territory shown for the problem. 

It’s important to remember that maintaining the ability to connect to other territories is extremely. If a player can give up some area in exchange for being able to connect, it is often well worth it and that option will be preferred.

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